preliminary thinking on co-authorship networks in health psychology

Health Psychology because a recognized subdiscipline in the late 1970s. In 19XX Health Psychology became the 38th Division of the APA. In 1982 their journal, Health Psychology, launched.

Here I am interested in exploring the sociality of health psychologists in the first decade after the founding of this publication: Who were the main collaborative actors during this period? What were the most active fields? Where were these researchers located? (This network is directed towards the first question with hopefully some suggestive hints as to the others).

First, I’ve imported my network data: Nodes are authors, edges represent co-authorship. For the purposes of this network, I have included only first and second authors.

network-mess

Next, I run my relevant statistics (Ave. Weighted Degree[1.315], Modularity[0.992], etc.)

Then I want to reduce the number of nodes I’m looking at so I can make sense of this mess. I hit Filters > Library > Attributes > Range

I decide to filter by weighted degree because I want to look at the most connected researchers. Interestingly, many of the most connected (those linked through publication co-authorship) don’t look like they’re connected to each other …

filtered-3to7

 

Now I want to start organizing the network into something more visually appealing so I can start to look into who and how these early health psychologists are related (if at all).

I go to Layout > Force Atlas

I adjust the Repulsion strength to 1000, I drop the Attraction strength to 0.01, and I click on the box to Adjust by Sizes. I also hit the box to Show Node Labels at bottom of display.

network444

I then go to Partition > Nodes > Modularity Class

network555

After having done this (color-coded them by modularity class), it’s interesting to reincorporate all of the data (nodes, edges) and re-run the layout (Force Atlas). This time I take off the Filters, up the Repulsion to 5000 and put the Attraction strength back up to 10.

It’s like releasing our well-connected nodes back into the wild with trackers so we can follow them and see exactly to whom they are connected.

Zooming in you can see some small networks:

lightblue11magenta11

But for the most part, it’s a sea of dyadic relations …

dyads11

When exported in .pdf with curved lines and labels …here

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sunderland’s itinerary on animaps

Here is my first attempt to map the travels of Sunderland using Animaps. I think this example gives an idea of what this API might be able to do. Here is a showcase of its features.

I divided eight years of travel data into seasons to approximate locations. For a more accurate map, travel times and a better factoring of time spent at each location is needed. In the interest of time, I opted not to include pop-ups or multiple viewpoints.

playing with clouds

Selye acknowledged that Cannon had used the term ‘stress’ before him, but only occasionally and in general terms to describe the “stress and strains” caused when disease and environment puts pressure on certain specific mechanisms necessary for homeostasis such as lack of oxygen or exposure to cold (Selye, 1956, 38). Selye explicitly drew upon these earlier uses of the word but argued that, “because Cannon was interested in the highly specific stabilizing mechanisms of the body,” he reasoned that there “was no reason why it should not be employed in this new sense” (Selye, 1956, 38). And besides, Selye continued, “Cannon never proposed the term [stress] as a scientific name… it does not even appear in the subject index of his book, and, as far as I know, he used it only figuratively in one semipopular lecture” (Selye, 1956, 39).

Bodily changes in pain, hunger, fear, and rage; an account of recent researches into the function of emotional excitement (1915) by Walter B. Cannon

Tag Clouds

Python:

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TagCrowd:

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Wordle:

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KWIC

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An intermediate textbook of physiological chemistry : with experiments (1917) by Chauncey Pettibone and James B. Collip

Tag Clouds

Python:

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TagCrowd:

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Wordle:

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KWIC

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Ngram Viewer (circa 2010) ?

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